d from seed forms a new variety, "all of which to

d from seed forms a new variety, "all of which to describe particularly," as old Gerarde wrote in 1597, "were to roll Sisyphus's stone, or to number the sands."HYACINTH (Hyacinthus orientalis).It may, however, be worth while to give a short account of this plant, which was introduced into England in 1596 from the Levant. (10/195. The best and fullest account of this plant which I have met with is by a famous horticulturist, Mr. Paul, of Waltham, in the 'Gardener's Chronicle' 1864 page 342.) The petals of the original flower, says Mr. Paul, were narrow, wrinkled, pointed, and of a flimsy texture; now they are broad, smooth, solid, and rounded. The erectness, breadth, and length of the whole spike, and the size of the flowers, have all increased. The colours have been intensified and diversified. Gerarde, in 1597, enumerates four, and Parkinson, in 1629, eight varieties. Now the varieties are very numerous, and they were still more numero

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